Ride Journal – Entry 3 – Cafe Ventoux with The Gilbert’s 

Ride Journal – Entry 3 had been planned for a while. A good friend of mine who lives up north is down for the week before he goes off to South Africa for 6 months. He’s also into his cycling so it was an opportunity to get out together. The ride was planned for the Thursday and we timed it perfectly, as despite the lousy weather over the last couple of weeks, Thursday was actually quite nice. The sun was out, the wind was down, what could go wrong?

The mystery of the missing Garmin

How about a missing Garmin? When cleaning my bike down the day before it turned out that my 3 year old decided to hide my bike computer. Not realising until the following morning before the ride, I spent 15 minutes tearing apart the garage until I gave up and headed over to Dunton Basset to meet John… ‘Garminless’

Ride Journal Entry 3 - Garminless

I set off at a gentle pace. John had text me the night before and told me his parents would be joining us. Both are into cycling but I expected it to be a slightly slower ride than usual, which to be honest is just what I needed. The conditions were perfect as I slipped through Ashby Parva and down into Leire, and missing my turn to Dunton meant I had to take the slightly longer route round, up a fairly steep 3 minute climb. I didn’t push it though, I just big ringed it at a very low cadence before reaching my rendezvous point.

Meet the Parents

A quick introduction with the parents (we’ve met briefly before) and we were on our way. Destination… Cafe Ventoux. The same place I wanted to go on Ride Journal Entry 1! However this time the place would be open (I checked beforehand) and early on the pace was actually fairly steady although having no Garmin meant I was only going on feel as we pushed on into a light headwind up towards Arnesby and on into Saddington. The short steep climbs around Saddington warmed the legs up nicely for our arrival into Kibworth. It turns out Mike grew up in n’ around Kibworth so I was able to get a bit historical knowledge of the area as we made our way through towards Cafe Ventoux.

Light cloud occasionally blocked out the sun and the pace was nice. Certainly easy enough for me to hold conversation with the company, but not to easy so it felt like a decent workout. I skipped breakfast so I was mostly pondering on what cake I’ll be tucking into upon arrival to the Bike shop come Cafe, come ‘Experience Centre‘. I think you need rides like this in your weekly routine. As I mentioned in my 6 1/2 steps for absolute beginners, you shouldn’t kill yourself on every outing and allowing time for your legs to recover will mean over-training or burning out shouldn’t be an issue.

Cafe Ventoux

We arrived at Cafe Ventoux at around 11am. A quick check of my phone revealed that the Strava App I’d been using as my Garmin backup had failed me only 6 miles into the ride! Marvellous! (Credit to John who sent me his GPX file later that afternoon so I had some record of my ride albeit slightly inaccurate). I ordered a flat white and a slice of carrot cake, somehow resisting the temptation of my usual choice of their rather tasty cinnamon flapjacks. We had a look around their Experience Centre, specifically their range of Boardman Elite bikes and stylish cycling apparel in the form of Le Col and Leicester based Velobici. £175 for a jersey though??? After balking at the costly price tags we made our way outside and awaited the arrival of our coffee and cake and well worth the wait it was. I found enough time in between shovelling cake to moan about my missing Garmin as well as discussing the impending apocalypse before we was again back on our bikes for the return leg of our ride.

Home Bound

The journey home incorporated much of the route out in reverse, with omission of the village of Cranroe instead opting for a lovely section of road though Gloosten. The road was tight with a very sharp climb followed by a fast descent through twisting terrain littered with potholes and loose gravel. The TCR absorbed the rough profile of the road with ease and I was able to tuck in and plunge down the hill at a lively pace side by side with John, making it by far the most enjoyable part of the ride. We were however halted by a puddle/lake at the very bottom forcing us to slowly creep around off road.

I took the opportunity to catch up with John  on the way back into Saddington and couldn’t help but be jealous as he spoke of his impending trip so South Africa… jammy bastard! Julia pushed on into the wind and I occasionally gave her a break doing my own stints at the front and as we made our way back past Bruntingthorpe Aerodrome myself and Julia had inadvertently opened up a little gap between ourselves and the other two.

I hate goodbyes!

We slowed the pace a little and only a mile further would pretty much be where we said our goodbyes. Mike, Julia and John headed back off to Dunton Basset and I hastily made my way home to Lutterworth aware that I hadn’t long before the start of my late shift. Continuing to match the previous ‘fairly relaxed’ effort I took in the familiar rural views of the surrounding Leicestershire countryside.

Arriving home with little time to spare, I hung my bike in the garage and decided to spend the 5 minutes I did have to renew the search for my missing Garmin. I only need 15 seconds though as I immediately set eyes on it nestled on the top of my tool box. Typical!

Ride Journal – Entry 2 – Wet and Windy… Again!

It seems that in recent weeks the only weather being thrown at South Leicestershire is plenty of wind and copious amounts of rain. Nevertheless, I can only cope with so many consecuetive days grinding away on the turbo, so it was time to get out there and in amongst the sodden local country lanes. And since this was my only ride in the week not on the turbo trainer, it has become my latest entry to my Ride Journal. See Entry 1 here

Hit that Sweet Spot

To be fair, changeable would be a more accurate description than biblical on this particular day so I thought I’d squeeze in 30 miles of Sweet Spot Training while there was a break in the clouds. I always consider Sweet Spot as one of my favourite forms of training, as riding at just below threshold for a prolonged period is hard but it doesn’t completely decimate you, like say intervals for example. It’s also great when you have limited training time as it helps to build your aerobic base while increasing your abilities at higher intensity too. Basically you get a lot of bang for your buck!

On into Warwickshire

I donned my cycling kit, removed my Giant TCR from the turbo and set off south towards Warwickshire. Although the rain was intermittent the wind was consistently blowing hard and I decided that heading out through the local Warwickshire villages would mean I would have a huge tailwind coming home. This tactic however promised a difficult ride out, fighting a block headwind and by Christ it was strong. Still, I always find it an advantage to struggle into the wind first so you can reap the rewards of a nice tail wind back.

Making it up as I go

Although I had a general direction planned, I made my route up as I went along. A local club I recently started riding with usually heads out this was so I was familiar with most of the roads. I headed out into Ullesthorpe, Claybrooke and the took a left to cross the A5 out towards the small village of Monks Kirby. The tarmac (as it is in most of the UK) was littered with loose gravel and potholes that I had to navigate down the short decent into the village centre. At this point the rain had begun to let off again and sunlight started to crack through the cloud cover.

Out the back of Monks Kirby I made another left up a short but tough kick up into and through Pailton and then on towards Rugby. The roads around heare were tight, twisting and fast and I quickly made ground out towards Kings Norton against the relentless headwind.

Even though I was somewhat familiar with these roads, my knowledge wasn’t exactly expert and that was more relevant the further from home I was. I found myself out on the other side of Brinklow, a small village between Rugby and Coventry. Recognising my location and aware of a possible route home down the Fosse Way I decided that this was going to be my point of return and the moment when that headwind would become my ally.

Finally a tailwind

I darted back through Brinklow, battling past the enticing aroma of the village Chippy and set nice pace down the Fosse. The perfectly straight tarmac meant that I had the full force of the tailwind at my aid. If it wasn’t for the fact that I’d spent the best part of 20 miles being battered by it then I would have considered it cheating! I was setting PR’s and I knew it. As I sailed home the rain returned and with that the slick terrain. These conditions were  slightly unnerving on the Fosse Way and with signs every 1/2 mile reminding me that I’m in a “high accident zone” I decided to turn off at Stretton and rejoin the route I took out through Monks Kirby.

Back into Leicestershire

I continued to set a very decent pace as I crossed the county border back into Leicestershire. In fact I managed a few top 10’s according to Strava. I was on the home straight and with a few miles to go I was fresh, fast and in great form. It was at this point when the weather gave me a big F**K YOU. As I turned towards the final stretch the wind had changed direction. Not only that, but it had increased to gale force conditions! I’d near enough come to a stop! Luckily I was almost home and I pressed on, head down over the bars, dodging flying debris and at one point a wheelie bin!

Almost home

I got home safely and took a moment as I stored my bike to catch breath and review my Strava recording. 0.1mph off a 20mph average!!! Damn headwind!