Giant TCR Advanced Pro 1 Review

Giant TCR Advanced Pro 1

A race ready lightweight road machine, with skinny tubes, compact geometry, full Ultegra groupset, and carbon tubeless ready wheels.

Upgrading from entry level

I’ve come from a 2014 Giant Defy, so any race oriented bike would probably feel light, stiff and agile compared to the relatively comfy yet equally enjoyable aluminium Defy. However I tested many bikes from rival bike manufacturers in pursuit of a new steed and for me the Giant TCR stood out. Let me point out that at first I wanted my new bike to be “anything but a Giant”. Not because I didn’t like my Defy, in fact I loved it. It was everything I wanted from my first road bike; however after thousands of miles on the Defy I wanted something lighter, racier and different to what I’m used to.

Giant TCR Advanced Pro 1 Review

Love at first sight?

I tried a few alternatives, actually I tried several. Yet I eventually succumbed to the matte black classy decals and the smooth compact geometry of the TCR’s frame. Along with the integrated seatpost clamp, fat downtube, internal cable routing and discreet RideSense Bluetooth/ANT+ sensor, this made for one understated and slick looking bicycle. So I decided a test ride was in order at my local Giant stockist. After already falling in love with the bikes aesthetics, I didn’t need the afternoon I had with the bike to fall in love with the ride quality, I just needed 10 minutes. A few hours later I was back at the bike shop placing an order for a Giant TCR Advanced Pro 1.

Many miles later…

A month and nearly 1000 miles in the saddle has passed and I’m still every bit as excited now when riding the TCR as I was on that first test ride. The thing the Giant TCR has in spades is its stiffness and its explosive feel on the road partly due to the Advanced Pro’s highly rated OverDrive 2 head tube allowing you to zip into and through corners as if you’re on rails. The TCR wants to be ridden aggressively, effectively transferring every bit of power from the legs through the bike most notable when accelerating out of twisting descents or up into climbs and despite the snappy and firm ride; it never seems to translate to discomfort. Perhaps it helps that by running tubeless I am able to run slightly lower pressure or maybe it the amount of seat pin on show due to the sloping top tube?

Giant TCR Advanced Pro 1 Review

Wheelie great

The stock wheels on this thing are incredible and by far out do most bikes in its price range. Giant specs its own wheels on their bikes and the Advance Pro 1 is fitted with tubeless ready SLR1’s which are lightweight and pretty hard to fault. Again the tyres are also Giant’s own and come in the form of the Gavia SLR 25mm tubeless. They come in slightly narrower than 25mm but they grip the road well enough (even in the wet) and ‘touch wood’, I haven’t had any issues with punctures yet despite the shockingly rough rural roads of Leicestershire. Although I’ve never ran tubeless before so I’m dreading the day I do have to use my tyre worms and super glue!


Superb Ultegra

The groupset on the Giant TCR Advance Pro 1 is Shimano’s ever reliable and exceptionally good Ultegra. My Giant Defy was equipped with Shimano 105 which I consider as one of the best (if not the best) around in terms of value for money. If I’m honest though I haven’t noticed too much of a difference with the upgrade other than the obvious weight reduction, but the Ultregra shifters are possibly slightly more positive when changing gear although the benefit is minimal. Check out this write up by for a head to head with Ultegra v 105

Giant TCR Advanced Pro 1 Review



I’m hard-pressed to find any negatives about this bike. I suppose Giant as a brand is slightly more common than others however that isn’t something that bothers me and I am yet to pass another Giant TCR with my paint scheme. Also I start to feel the saddle a bit on anything over 50 miles, so that may be something I choose to swap out in the near future however that is more of a personal preference. The only other slight negative I’ve found is with the integrated seatpost clamp and that my seat slipped down after a few rides. Although I’d probably put that down to the setup by my LBS rather than the capability of the clamp itself as I haven’t really had any problems since I put an extra couple of turns on the clamp screw.


To sum up, the performance of this bike is second to none, especially if you’re riding it hard! It’s light, responsive and it makes you feel fast! The value for money is great, punching well above its price tag and being equipped with Giants excellent in-house ancillaries, it isn’t a bike where you will be looking to swap out the wheels ASAP. In short, if you are looking for a race ready bike straight out of the box, then this is it!

Giant TCR Advanced Pro 1 Review


Frame: Advanced Grade Composite, Electronic Ready
Fork: Advanced-Grade Composite, Full-Composite OverDrive 2 Steerer
Handlebar: Giant Contact SL
Stem: Giant Contact SL
Seatpost: Giant Variant Composite
Saddle: Giant Contact SL Forward
Shifters: Shimano Ultegra
Front Derailleur: Shimano Ultegra
Rear Derailleur: Shimano Ultegra
Brakes: Shimano Ultegra
Brake Levers: Shimano Ultegra
Cassette: Shimano Ultegra 11×28
Chain: KMC X11EL-1
Crankset: Shimano Ultegra 36/52
Bottom Bracket: Shimano BB-71 press fit
Wheels: Giant SLR 1 WheelSystem
Tyres: Giant Gavia SL Tubeless, 700x25mm, Folding
Other: RideSense BlueTooth/ANT+

Ride Journal – Entry 3 – Cafe Ventoux with The Gilbert’s 

Ride Journal – Entry 3 had been planned for a while. A good friend of mine who lives up north is down for the week before he goes off to South Africa for 6 months. He’s also into his cycling so it was an opportunity to get out together. The ride was planned for the Thursday and we timed it perfectly, as despite the lousy weather over the last couple of weeks, Thursday was actually quite nice. The sun was out, the wind was down, what could go wrong?

The mystery of the missing Garmin

How about a missing Garmin? When cleaning my bike down the day before it turned out that my 3 year old decided to hide my bike computer. Not realising until the following morning before the ride, I spent 15 minutes tearing apart the garage until I gave up and headed over to Dunton Basset to meet John… ‘Garminless’

Ride Journal Entry 3 - Garminless

I set off at a gentle pace. John had text me the night before and told me his parents would be joining us. Both are into cycling but I expected it to be a slightly slower ride than usual, which to be honest is just what I needed. The conditions were perfect as I slipped through Ashby Parva and down into Leire, and missing my turn to Dunton meant I had to take the slightly longer route round, up a fairly steep 3 minute climb. I didn’t push it though, I just big ringed it at a very low cadence before reaching my rendezvous point.

Meet the Parents

A quick introduction with the parents (we’ve met briefly before) and we were on our way. Destination… Cafe Ventoux. The same place I wanted to go on Ride Journal Entry 1! However this time the place would be open (I checked beforehand) and early on the pace was actually fairly steady although having no Garmin meant I was only going on feel as we pushed on into a light headwind up towards Arnesby and on into Saddington. The short steep climbs around Saddington warmed the legs up nicely for our arrival into Kibworth. It turns out Mike grew up in n’ around Kibworth so I was able to get a bit historical knowledge of the area as we made our way through towards Cafe Ventoux.

Light cloud occasionally blocked out the sun and the pace was nice. Certainly easy enough for me to hold conversation with the company, but not to easy so it felt like a decent workout. I skipped breakfast so I was mostly pondering on what cake I’ll be tucking into upon arrival to the Bike shop come Cafe, come ‘Experience Centre‘. I think you need rides like this in your weekly routine. As I mentioned in my 6 1/2 steps for absolute beginners, you shouldn’t kill yourself on every outing and allowing time for your legs to recover will mean over-training or burning out shouldn’t be an issue.

Cafe Ventoux

We arrived at Cafe Ventoux at around 11am. A quick check of my phone revealed that the Strava App I’d been using as my Garmin backup had failed me only 6 miles into the ride! Marvellous! (Credit to John who sent me his GPX file later that afternoon so I had some record of my ride albeit slightly inaccurate). I ordered a flat white and a slice of carrot cake, somehow resisting the temptation of my usual choice of their rather tasty cinnamon flapjacks. We had a look around their Experience Centre, specifically their range of Boardman Elite bikes and stylish cycling apparel in the form of Le Col and Leicester based Velobici. £175 for a jersey though??? After balking at the costly price tags we made our way outside and awaited the arrival of our coffee and cake and well worth the wait it was. I found enough time in between shovelling cake to moan about my missing Garmin as well as discussing the impending apocalypse before we was again back on our bikes for the return leg of our ride.

Home Bound

The journey home incorporated much of the route out in reverse, with omission of the village of Cranroe instead opting for a lovely section of road though Gloosten. The road was tight with a very sharp climb followed by a fast descent through twisting terrain littered with potholes and loose gravel. The TCR absorbed the rough profile of the road with ease and I was able to tuck in and plunge down the hill at a lively pace side by side with John, making it by far the most enjoyable part of the ride. We were however halted by a puddle/lake at the very bottom forcing us to slowly creep around off road.

I took the opportunity to catch up with John  on the way back into Saddington and couldn’t help but be jealous as he spoke of his impending trip so South Africa… jammy bastard! Julia pushed on into the wind and I occasionally gave her a break doing my own stints at the front and as we made our way back past Bruntingthorpe Aerodrome myself and Julia had inadvertently opened up a little gap between ourselves and the other two.

I hate goodbyes!

We slowed the pace a little and only a mile further would pretty much be where we said our goodbyes. Mike, Julia and John headed back off to Dunton Basset and I hastily made my way home to Lutterworth aware that I hadn’t long before the start of my late shift. Continuing to match the previous ‘fairly relaxed’ effort I took in the familiar rural views of the surrounding Leicestershire countryside.

Arriving home with little time to spare, I hung my bike in the garage and decided to spend the 5 minutes I did have to renew the search for my missing Garmin. I only need 15 seconds though as I immediately set eyes on it nestled on the top of my tool box. Typical!

Get Bike Fit – 6 1/2 Steps for an Absolute Beginner

Cycling is a great way to get fit and for me Road Biking is the best way to do it. Your road bike is all about going far and going fast so here is 6 1/2 steps for an absolute beginner who wants to get fitter, faster and further on their road bike.  

Step 1: Get a bike

Fairly obvious really. Being an absolute beginner means you may not even have a bike. But buying a bike may not be as simple one may think. Many things may need to be taken into consideration. Budget for starters, but questions need to be asked like what type of riding will you be doing? What type of riding do you want to be doing in the future? What type of riding do your friends do? You don’t want to limit yourself, but at the same time you want to make the most of your situation and passion.

For example maybe you want to do endurance or adventure riding? Perhaps your an urban commuter but want to get into local club riding or criterium’s? Chances are you may have no idea what riding you want to do and you just want to go out and ride. The beauty of road cycling is its versatility and whatever you decide there is a bike out there for you!

Absolute Beginner? Get a bike
mmmmmmmmm…. new bike

Step 2: Go out and ride

Even more obvious than step 1! But its true. You don’t need to worry about getting fitter yet. Forget training plans and FTP tests and concentrate on enjoying your bike and growing in confidence. Learn the basics like bike handling skills and road smarts. Learn to ride with clipless pedals and to take on fuel while on the move.

Absolute Beginner? Ride
Get out and ride… and take pictures of your bike

Step 3: Set a goal

Okay, now we are beginning to move away from the absolute beginner status. You own a bike and you’ve been putting in the miles. Your confidence has grown and you’ve probably started to notice your fitness increase already, just by getting out and about on your bike. Now you want to start pushing it to the next level? You need a goal.

It might be something as simple as loosing 10kg or maybe completing a 100km or 100 mile ride. Maybe you’ve set a goal as a group like cycle coast to coast? Whatever it is, by setting a goal you will be provided you with the motivation you need to get on your bike even when you don’t want to.

Step 4: Live well off the bike

Cycling is all about power to weight. The stronger you are the faster you go, the lighter you are the faster you go… its simple really. I’m for anything in moderation but if you want to see the benefits of getting faster and being able to go further, then your’e going to have to make a commitment off the bike as well. By eating healthy you are going to improve your performance on a bike. Make sure you fuel well pre and post ride and sleep well to allow for your body to recover.

Absolute Beginner? Lay off the fatty food
Lay off the fatty food!

Step 5: Go out and ride more

If you want to get fitter you’ve got to do the work, so set aside time to get out on your bike. Many of us can’t spend every day on our bike so cheat a bit. Try and commute to work a few times a week to get those extra miles in or use a turbo trainer for when the weather is poor or the nights are longer. Ride with friends or even join a local club so that you are committed to riding more with likeminded people.


Step 6: Train on specifics

Start working on the specifics. Im not talking about getting a coach or anything (unless you want to). Just put together a basic plan which suits your goal or objective. Throw in some longer distance rides if you want to improve your endurance. Chuck in some intervals on that commute to work by sprinting to sign posts or going in hard up every hill. Have a day when you just go all out as hard as you can for as long as you can. Even have a rest day where you just spin the legs for that recovery.

Absolute Beginner? Work on Specifics
Get that sweat on!

Step 6 1/2: Analyse, review and build

What are you doing well at? What needs improving? Maybe you’re really fast for 15 miles but then rapidly tail off as you go further? Build on your strengths and target those weaknesses by tweaking your riding. You will find quickly that you move from absolute beginner to absolute machine!

Absolute Beginner? Become a machine
Become a MACHINE


Ride Journal – Entry 2 – Wet and Windy… Again!

It seems that in recent weeks the only weather being thrown at South Leicestershire is plenty of wind and copious amounts of rain. Nevertheless, I can only cope with so many consecuetive days grinding away on the turbo, so it was time to get out there and in amongst the sodden local country lanes. And since this was my only ride in the week not on the turbo trainer, it has become my latest entry to my Ride Journal. See Entry 1 here

Hit that Sweet Spot

To be fair, changeable would be a more accurate description than biblical on this particular day so I thought I’d squeeze in 30 miles of Sweet Spot Training while there was a break in the clouds. I always consider Sweet Spot as one of my favourite forms of training, as riding at just below threshold for a prolonged period is hard but it doesn’t completely decimate you, like say intervals for example. It’s also great when you have limited training time as it helps to build your aerobic base while increasing your abilities at higher intensity too. Basically you get a lot of bang for your buck!

On into Warwickshire

I donned my cycling kit, removed my Giant TCR from the turbo and set off south towards Warwickshire. Although the rain was intermittent the wind was consistently blowing hard and I decided that heading out through the local Warwickshire villages would mean I would have a huge tailwind coming home. This tactic however promised a difficult ride out, fighting a block headwind and by Christ it was strong. Still, I always find it an advantage to struggle into the wind first so you can reap the rewards of a nice tail wind back.

Making it up as I go

Although I had a general direction planned, I made my route up as I went along. A local club I recently started riding with usually heads out this was so I was familiar with most of the roads. I headed out into Ullesthorpe, Claybrooke and the took a left to cross the A5 out towards the small village of Monks Kirby. The tarmac (as it is in most of the UK) was littered with loose gravel and potholes that I had to navigate down the short decent into the village centre. At this point the rain had begun to let off again and sunlight started to crack through the cloud cover.

Out the back of Monks Kirby I made another left up a short but tough kick up into and through Pailton and then on towards Rugby. The roads around heare were tight, twisting and fast and I quickly made ground out towards Kings Norton against the relentless headwind.

Even though I was somewhat familiar with these roads, my knowledge wasn’t exactly expert and that was more relevant the further from home I was. I found myself out on the other side of Brinklow, a small village between Rugby and Coventry. Recognising my location and aware of a possible route home down the Fosse Way I decided that this was going to be my point of return and the moment when that headwind would become my ally.

Finally a tailwind

I darted back through Brinklow, battling past the enticing aroma of the village Chippy and set nice pace down the Fosse. The perfectly straight tarmac meant that I had the full force of the tailwind at my aid. If it wasn’t for the fact that I’d spent the best part of 20 miles being battered by it then I would have considered it cheating! I was setting PR’s and I knew it. As I sailed home the rain returned and with that the slick terrain. These conditions were  slightly unnerving on the Fosse Way and with signs every 1/2 mile reminding me that I’m in a “high accident zone” I decided to turn off at Stretton and rejoin the route I took out through Monks Kirby.

Back into Leicestershire

I continued to set a very decent pace as I crossed the county border back into Leicestershire. In fact I managed a few top 10’s according to Strava. I was on the home straight and with a few miles to go I was fresh, fast and in great form. It was at this point when the weather gave me a big F**K YOU. As I turned towards the final stretch the wind had changed direction. Not only that, but it had increased to gale force conditions! I’d near enough come to a stop! Luckily I was almost home and I pressed on, head down over the bars, dodging flying debris and at one point a wheelie bin!

Almost home

I got home safely and took a moment as I stored my bike to catch breath and review my Strava recording. 0.1mph off a 20mph average!!! Damn headwind!

Chapeau Café Jersey

Style over function?

I’ve owned the Chapeau Café Jersey now for almost a year to the day. I know this as it was an anniversary present from my wife, who bought it for me as I was after a Jersey that was more for my weekend rides with friends rather than training or even racing. I’d had my eye on Chapeau as a brand, and even though at the time I’d never owned anything by Chapeau, I liked what they were about, stylish, reasonably priced and not too common.

Chapeau's Stylish Cafe Range made from 64% bamboo
Chapeau Cafe Jersey – Blue Chest Stripe

My wife paid £50 (full price) for the Chapeau Café Jersey, bought from their online store. Delivery was “prompt” according to her and upon receiving the gift I was suitably impressed. My wife bought me the design titled “Blue Chest Stripe” as requested and with the Café range described as “a relaxed fit jersey… suitable for casual weekend rides and commuting” the cut certainly reflected that. It’s not something made for marginal gains. I’m 6ft and at 75kg the top hung quite low and loose on the biceps and chest. When I say loose, it was tight for a t-shirt but certainly looser than cycling jerseys I’m used to. The fabric had the feel of a cotton based material (apparently 64% bamboo/polyester) so it made for a comfortable feel and again very different to any other cycling jersey I own.

Chapeau Cafe Jersey

Not designed for efforts?

For the first few months I loved the Chapeau Café Jersey and it actually became my favourite jersey for a good while. I even wore it for a couple of local sportives, however I did notice some issues. The rear pockets started to sag on longer rides if you store stuff in them. In fact I’ve found that after just holding my phone in my rear pockets for a couple of hours, the material stretches to a point where it starts catching the underside of my seat when I climb out of the saddle!

Another issue is perspiration concealment. This isn’t normally an issue and if you stick to rides that the Jersey is designed for i.e. casual rides to the local café, then it probably won’t ever be an issue either. However, if like me you sweat at the mere mention of a ‘hard effort’ then this jersey probably won’t display you in the best light when you reach your destination. The sweat really shows on this jersey, similar to that when wearing a t-shirt on an indoor turbo trainer.

Chapeau Cafe Jersey Sweat

Again though, the Chapeau Café Jersey isn’t really made for hard efforts and intense workouts. If you want that then the Chapeau Tempo range would probably be the best choice to make. I do have one final gripe though. The Chapeau Café Jersey hasn’t aged well. Even though it’s a year old, I used to save it purely for my weekend rides and the odd jaunt out in the week with friends. Even then I barely wore it through the winter months as I opted for slightly warmer gear. However, even with so relatively little use, the Jersey now appears washed and overly worn. The material looks like an old t-shirt I’d decorate the front room wearing, which is disappointing for something that’s not expensive but not exactly budget. Maybe it would age better if hand washed only?


I like the look and style of the Chapeau Café Jersey  when I was out with friends (long beard optional). First impressions were comfortable, good quality and reasonable pricing. However it has not aged well and the fact that the material and longer cut means the rear pockets are borderline unusable for anything other than a credit card means I probably wouldn’t buy again.



I used to be fat and slow. Just check my Strava back in 2014, I can prove it! But through cycling I was able to drop from 15.5st to 11.5st and actually become a half decent Road Cyclist in the process.


Don’t get me wrong, I’m certainly no pro. If you are, then I probably won’t be able to offer you much advice. But if you’re a budding cyclist who wants to get fit and fairly fast then I reckon my experience over the last 2 years would be worth a read.

My plan? To blog about my rides. What do I do to get leaner and faster? What do I wear to make me faster? How do I stay motivated to get back on the bike? What type of riding do I do? And much much more.