Commuting to get Fit

I’m always trying to get faster on the bike and its fairly obvious that the best way to do that is by spending more time on the bike. But if you’re like me and you often find yourself working long hours, or you enjoy spending your time at home with your wife and kids, then its hard to find enough time to get some decent miles in the legs.

Commute Angry

I’m a strong believer in quality over quantity and if you can squeeze in just a few extra rides with some quality workouts then you will be well on your way to getting much more bike fit. One great way of squeezing in extra miles? Commuting to work by bike. The secret is to commute angry! Ride as hard as you can to work if the road and traffic allow of course. And if you can afford to, increase the distance somewhat on the return trip and chuck in some hard intervals. Like I said, Quality not Quantity and you if you ca make a 5-10 mile commute as hard as a 30-40 mile weekend ride then you are on the right path.

Commute to get fit

 

Extra weight and less aero

Often when commuting you are carrying a lot of extra weight, a change of clothes, your lunch, maybe your even riding on your heavy commuter bike? Also you probably won’t be wearing your most aero clothing.  I’m usually not in kit that Team Sky would endorse, often commuting in a t-shirt and football shorts . All the extra weight and increased air resistance will make you feel like your flying though when you get back on a race light machine with your performance lycra!

A little is better than nothing at all

I don’t do it every day, but I find that by cycling to work and back maybe 2 or 3 times a week has vastly increased my performance on my club and weekend rides. I’m honestly fitter than I’ve ever been because of it. Not only that, I’ve saved an absolute mint in fuel costs! Yes, you could just get out on your bike every evening instead, but then you miss out on the family time. So while the weather is nice and the days are still long, why not give it a try to make up for those hours you don’t get to spend on your bike?

Ride Journal – Entry 2 – Wet and Windy… Again!

It seems that in recent weeks the only weather being thrown at South Leicestershire is plenty of wind and copious amounts of rain. Nevertheless, I can only cope with so many consecuetive days grinding away on the turbo, so it was time to get out there and in amongst the sodden local country lanes. And since this was my only ride in the week not on the turbo trainer, it has become my latest entry to my Ride Journal. See Entry 1 here

Hit that Sweet Spot

To be fair, changeable would be a more accurate description than biblical on this particular day so I thought I’d squeeze in 30 miles of Sweet Spot Training while there was a break in the clouds. I always consider Sweet Spot as one of my favourite forms of training, as riding at just below threshold for a prolonged period is hard but it doesn’t completely decimate you, like say intervals for example. It’s also great when you have limited training time as it helps to build your aerobic base while increasing your abilities at higher intensity too. Basically you get a lot of bang for your buck!

On into Warwickshire

I donned my cycling kit, removed my Giant TCR from the turbo and set off south towards Warwickshire. Although the rain was intermittent the wind was consistently blowing hard and I decided that heading out through the local Warwickshire villages would mean I would have a huge tailwind coming home. This tactic however promised a difficult ride out, fighting a block headwind and by Christ it was strong. Still, I always find it an advantage to struggle into the wind first so you can reap the rewards of a nice tail wind back.

Making it up as I go

Although I had a general direction planned, I made my route up as I went along. A local club I recently started riding with usually heads out this was so I was familiar with most of the roads. I headed out into Ullesthorpe, Claybrooke and the took a left to cross the A5 out towards the small village of Monks Kirby. The tarmac (as it is in most of the UK) was littered with loose gravel and potholes that I had to navigate down the short decent into the village centre. At this point the rain had begun to let off again and sunlight started to crack through the cloud cover.

Out the back of Monks Kirby I made another left up a short but tough kick up into and through Pailton and then on towards Rugby. The roads around heare were tight, twisting and fast and I quickly made ground out towards Kings Norton against the relentless headwind.

Even though I was somewhat familiar with these roads, my knowledge wasn’t exactly expert and that was more relevant the further from home I was. I found myself out on the other side of Brinklow, a small village between Rugby and Coventry. Recognising my location and aware of a possible route home down the Fosse Way I decided that this was going to be my point of return and the moment when that headwind would become my ally.

Finally a tailwind

I darted back through Brinklow, battling past the enticing aroma of the village Chippy and set nice pace down the Fosse. The perfectly straight tarmac meant that I had the full force of the tailwind at my aid. If it wasn’t for the fact that I’d spent the best part of 20 miles being battered by it then I would have considered it cheating! I was setting PR’s and I knew it. As I sailed home the rain returned and with that the slick terrain. These conditions were  slightly unnerving on the Fosse Way and with signs every 1/2 mile reminding me that I’m in a “high accident zone” I decided to turn off at Stretton and rejoin the route I took out through Monks Kirby.

Back into Leicestershire

I continued to set a very decent pace as I crossed the county border back into Leicestershire. In fact I managed a few top 10’s according to Strava. I was on the home straight and with a few miles to go I was fresh, fast and in great form. It was at this point when the weather gave me a big F**K YOU. As I turned towards the final stretch the wind had changed direction. Not only that, but it had increased to gale force conditions! I’d near enough come to a stop! Luckily I was almost home and I pressed on, head down over the bars, dodging flying debris and at one point a wheelie bin!

Almost home

I got home safely and took a moment as I stored my bike to catch breath and review my Strava recording. 0.1mph off a 20mph average!!! Damn headwind!

Chapeau Café Jersey

Style over function?

I’ve owned the Chapeau Café Jersey now for almost a year to the day. I know this as it was an anniversary present from my wife, who bought it for me as I was after a Jersey that was more for my weekend rides with friends rather than training or even racing. I’d had my eye on Chapeau as a brand, and even though at the time I’d never owned anything by Chapeau, I liked what they were about, stylish, reasonably priced and not too common.

Chapeau's Stylish Cafe Range made from 64% bamboo
Chapeau Cafe Jersey – Blue Chest Stripe

My wife paid £50 (full price) for the Chapeau Café Jersey, bought from their online store. Delivery was “prompt” according to her and upon receiving the gift I was suitably impressed. My wife bought me the design titled “Blue Chest Stripe” as requested and with the Café range described as “a relaxed fit jersey… suitable for casual weekend rides and commuting” the cut certainly reflected that. It’s not something made for marginal gains. I’m 6ft and at 75kg the top hung quite low and loose on the biceps and chest. When I say loose, it was tight for a t-shirt but certainly looser than cycling jerseys I’m used to. The fabric had the feel of a cotton based material (apparently 64% bamboo/polyester) so it made for a comfortable feel and again very different to any other cycling jersey I own.

Chapeau Cafe Jersey

Not designed for efforts?

For the first few months I loved the Chapeau Café Jersey and it actually became my favourite jersey for a good while. I even wore it for a couple of local sportives, however I did notice some issues. The rear pockets started to sag on longer rides if you store stuff in them. In fact I’ve found that after just holding my phone in my rear pockets for a couple of hours, the material stretches to a point where it starts catching the underside of my seat when I climb out of the saddle!

Another issue is perspiration concealment. This isn’t normally an issue and if you stick to rides that the Jersey is designed for i.e. casual rides to the local café, then it probably won’t ever be an issue either. However, if like me you sweat at the mere mention of a ‘hard effort’ then this jersey probably won’t display you in the best light when you reach your destination. The sweat really shows on this jersey, similar to that when wearing a t-shirt on an indoor turbo trainer.

Chapeau Cafe Jersey Sweat

Again though, the Chapeau Café Jersey isn’t really made for hard efforts and intense workouts. If you want that then the Chapeau Tempo range would probably be the best choice to make. I do have one final gripe though. The Chapeau Café Jersey hasn’t aged well. Even though it’s a year old, I used to save it purely for my weekend rides and the odd jaunt out in the week with friends. Even then I barely wore it through the winter months as I opted for slightly warmer gear. However, even with so relatively little use, the Jersey now appears washed and overly worn. The material looks like an old t-shirt I’d decorate the front room wearing, which is disappointing for something that’s not expensive but not exactly budget. Maybe it would age better if hand washed only?

Conclusion

I like the look and style of the Chapeau Café Jersey  when I was out with friends (long beard optional). First impressions were comfortable, good quality and reasonable pricing. However it has not aged well and the fact that the material and longer cut means the rear pockets are borderline unusable for anything other than a credit card means I probably wouldn’t buy again.

6/10

Ride Journal – Entry 1 – Wet, Windy and Starving

I’ve decided to review some of my rides in a weekly segment called Ride Journal. In the first addition I write about a ride that was only supposed to be a quick 6 mile commute 

I was only supposed to be riding the short commute back home when I was asked by a colleague if I fancied going out for a decent ride after work. I had my kit in my locker and normally it would be a great idea, although on this particular day I hadn’t actually eaten anything. It was approaching 2:30pm, I could possibly get away within an hour, however my stomach was already groaning at the lack of any breakfast or lunch. In fact only half a bakewell flapjack from the company canteen had passed my lips that whole day.

“When you say decent ride… how decent?”

Café Ventoux and back?” my colleague replied.

The ‘Cafe Ventoux Loop’ is one of my regular rides so I’m well aware that it is 25 miles out from my house, plus the six miles extra from work.

“Scratch that, it closes at 5pm on Fridays, we could just go out that way though and find a coffee shop”.

Some ummin’ and arrin’ later and I agreed to join him, but only if the Coffee Shop we found sold slabs of cake, so I could at least run on some form of fuel. One hour later I was on my bike. The first 10 minutes of the ride consisted of me making excuses for my almost inevitable bonk. We were flying though, aided by an absolutely glorious tail wind behind us. The first half of the ride was fairly flat too, so other than a few junctions and some temporary traffic lights we were able maintain a decent tempo.

By the time we reached Saddington we had decided that our destination should be the small market town of Uppingham, Rutland. My colleague knew it well and informed me that I had in fact cycled there once before, last year as part of the Rutland Arrivederci Century ride. I believe it was around 90 miles in so I was most likely flagging a bit. At this point the route was beginning to become a bit up and down, with plenty of short sharp kicks offering a perfect environment for some hill intervals. It helps when you ride with someone of an equal ability, if not slightly better, as it pushes you to maintain the pace or at best keep up. This was certainly the case today, especially since I was approaching 20 hours with little or no food.

The hill intervals had taken its toll. As we approached Stockerston my legs were burning with lactic acid. I was also beginning to rekindle the memories of Rutland Arrivederci. One memory in particular was the Climb into Uppingham itself. I remember it being absolute torture last year and with the glorious tail wind of before now a prominent cross wind, I was dreading it.

Low and behold, Stockerston Climb was a relative breeze. It turns out that those months I’ve spent on the indoor turbo trainer has served me well. Don’t get me wrong, my legs felt it, but I set a decent pace and refusing to be provoked into an attack against my colleage, I tucked in, head down and ground away. Before I knew it I was in Uppingham, lid off, tucking into coffee and cake at Don Paddy’s. “Food!”, my stomach could barely believe it. I must say it was possibly the nicest cake I’ve ever eaten, although it would have most likely been the nicest scabby horse I’d ever eaten if that was served alongside my latte.

 

It was while my colleague was offering concern that I was deliberately starving myself in order to beat him up the climbs (I’m not by the way) that the clouds darkened and the heavens began to open. This was going to be a miserable 30 mile ride home in driving rain and a block head wind, running solely on a milky coffee and a slice of Victoria Sponge. A quick stretch of the legs and a downing of the remaining drops of my now cooled caffeine hit and we were again on our way. I decided to sit on the front, channelling my inner Kwiatkowski, and although I didn’t feel the need to chuck my glasses on the roadside I was certainly pushing hard through the almost biblical conditions. The surface was slick in places and flooded in others and I carefully nudged down the hills as opposed to thrashing it down as I did on the way out. Still, despite the wind, rain and lack of food we were able to press on home at a decent pace, swapping duties at the font akin to a mini chain gang albeit only two of us.

As we approached my colleagues house (who lives 5 miles closer than I do) we were absolutely sodden. His teasing earlier about me being anorexic had dissipated and was replaced with heavy breathing with intermittent silence as we rolled into his village. I suppose 50 odd hard miles does that to a man. We pulled over and found some time to moan a bit more about the conditions, but in truth I think we both had enjoyed the battle.

It was then that I was left with the dilemma of having only 5 miles to go, however if I went the long way I could bump my ride up a few miles to get a nice round 100km’s in the legs. Even in this weather, it wasn’t up for debate.

So off I went, home… the long way round.

 

 

 

Intro

I used to be fat and slow. Just check my Strava back in 2014, I can prove it! But through cycling I was able to drop from 15.5st to 11.5st and actually become a half decent Road Cyclist in the process.

P1040312

Don’t get me wrong, I’m certainly no pro. If you are, then I probably won’t be able to offer you much advice. But if you’re a budding cyclist who wants to get fit and fairly fast then I reckon my experience over the last 2 years would be worth a read.

My plan? To blog about my rides. What do I do to get leaner and faster? What do I wear to make me faster? How do I stay motivated to get back on the bike? What type of riding do I do? And much much more.